The list of Invasive Plants. Medicinal and edible uses of Air Potato and Autumn Olive

Listed below are the plant species for which USDA have completed species profiles – general information about plant species commonly known as invasive. This is not a full list of all invasive plant species, nor does it have any regulatory implications. These profiles are provided as an educational informational tool.
We at VIFarms did a research on the traditional medicinal and culinary uses of these plants, which are being exterminated in the US at a great cost. We found that about 98% of the plants- and possibly all the plants- have powerful medicinal qualities, and many are used as food in the countries of their origin. This research is our example of sustainable thinking. We hope a result of this work few pesticide-making companies will make a little less profit and many more people will spend less of their money on drugs to keep healthy and happy.

1.Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera)
2.Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata)
Beach Vitex (Vitex rotundifolia)
Brazilian Peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius)
.Canada Thistle (Cirsium arvense)
Chinese Tallow (Triadica sebifera)
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica)
Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum)
Dalmatian Toadflax (Linaria dalmatica)
Diffuse Knapweed (Centaurea diffusa)
Downy Brome (Bromus tectorum)
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna)
7.Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum)
Hairy Whitetop (Lepidium appelianum)
Houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale)
Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum)
9.Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica)
10. Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica)
11. Japanese Spiraea (Spiraea japonica)
Japanese Stilt Grass (Microstegium vimineum)
Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)
12. Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata)
13. Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia esula)
Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae)
14. Mile-A-Minute Weed (Persicaria perfoliata)
15. Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)
16. Musk Thistle (Carduus nutans)
Old World Climbing Fern (Lygodium microphyllum)
17. Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus)
18. Princess Tree (Paulownia tomentosa)
19. Purple Star Thistle (Centaurea calcitrapa)
Quackgrass (Elymus repens)
20. Russian Knapweed (Rhaponticum repens)
21. Russian Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia)
22. Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.)
23. St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum)
24 Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius)
Scotch Thistle (Onopordum acanthium)
25. Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe)
26. Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima)
Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum)
Whitetop (Lepidium draba)
Witchweed (Striga asiatica)
Yellow Star Thistle (Centaurea solstitialis)
Yellow Toadflax (Linaria vulgaris)

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider
Dioscorea bulbifera

1.Air potato

Dioscorea bulbifera, the Air potato, is a yam species. It is also known as Varahi in Sanskrit, Kaachil in Malayalam and Dukkar Kand in Marathi. The Air potato plant is native to Africa and Asia.
ESCRIPTION
Dioscorea bulbifera is a perennial vine with broad leaves and two types of storage organs. The plant forms bulbils in the leaf axils of the twining stems, and tubers beneath the ground. These tubers are like small, oblong potatoes, and they are edible and cultivated as a food crop, especially in West Africa. The tubers often have a bitter taste, which can be removed by boiling. They can then be prepared in the same way as other yams, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. The air potato is one of the most widely-consumed yam species.It can grow up to 150 feet tall. Air potato can grow extremely quickly, roughly 8 inches per day, and eventually reach over 60 feet long. It typically climbs to the tops of trees and has a tendency to take over native plants. New plants develop from bulbils that form on the plant, and these bulbils serve as a means of dispersal. The aerial stems of air potato die back in winter, but resprouting occurs from bulbils and underground tubers. The primary means of spread and reproduction are via bulbils. The smallest bulbils make control of air potato difficult due to their ability to sprout at a very small stage. The vine produces small white flowers, however these are rarely seen when it grows in Florida.
USES
Air potato has been used as a folk remedy to treat conjunctivitis, diarrhea and dysentery, among other ailments.[1]
[edit] Toxicity
Uncultivated forms, such as those found growing wild in Florida can be poisonous. These varieties contain the steroid, diosgenin, which is a principal material used in the manufacture of a number of synthetic steroidal hormones, such as those used in hormonal contraception.[2] There have been claims[3] that even the wild forms are rendered edible after drying and boiling, leading to confusion over actual toxicity.

2. AUTUMN OLIVE

Latin name: Elaeagnus umbellata

Synonyms: Elaeagnus crispa

Family: Elaeagnaceae (Oleaster Family)

Medicinal use of Autumn Olive:
The flowers are astringent, cardiac and stimulant. The seeds are used as a stimulant in the treatment of coughs. The expressed oil from the seeds is used in the treatment of pulmonary affections. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.
Habitat of the herb:
Thickets and thin woods in the lowland and hills.
Edible parts of Autumn Olive:
Fruit – raw or cooked. Juicy and pleasantly acid, they are tasty raw and can also be made into jams, preserves etc. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent. The fruit contains about 8.3% sugars, 4.5% protein, 1% ash. The vitamin C content is about 12mg per 100g. Mature bushes in the wild yield about 650g of fruit over 2 – 3 pickings. The harvested fruit stores for about 15 days at room temperature. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter and contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous.
Other uses of the herb:
Very tolerant of maritime exposure, it makes a good informal hedge, succeeding even in very exposed positions. The plants make a reasonable wind-protecting screen, they are about as wide as they are tall. They make a good companion hedge, enriching the soil and fertilizing neighbouring plants. The wood is a good fuel.
Propagation of Autumn Olive:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. It should germinate in late winter or early spring, though it may take 18 months. Stored seed can be very slow to germinate, often taking more than 18 months. A warm stratification for 4 weeks followed by 12 weeks cold stratification can help. The seed usually (eventually) germinates quite well. Prick out the seedlings into individual pot as soon as they are large enough to handle and plant out when they are at least 15cm tall. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 – 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Good percentage. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year’s growth, 10 – 12cm with a heel, November in a frame. Leave for 12 months. Fair to good percentage. Layering in September/October. Takes 12 months.
Cultivation of the herb:
Thickets and thin woods in the lowland and hills.
Known hazards of Elaeagnus umbellata:
None known
Source: http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/e/elaeagnus-umbellata=autumn-olive.php

Air Potato (Dioscorea bulbifera)
Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata)
Beach Vitex (Vitex rotundifolia)
Brazilian Peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius)
Canada Thistle (Cirsium arvense)
Chinese Tallow (Triadica sebifera)
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica)
Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum)
Dalmatian Toadflax (Linaria dalmatica)
Diffuse Knapweed (Centaurea diffusa)
Downy Brome (Bromus tectorum)
Fig Buttercup (Ficaria verna)
Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata)
Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum)
Hairy Whitetop (Lepidium appelianum)
Houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale)
Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum)
Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica)
Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica)
Japanese Spiraea (Spiraea japonica)
Japanese Stilt Grass (Microstegium vimineum)
Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense)
Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata)
Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia esula)
Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae)
Mile-A-Minute Weed (Persicaria perfoliata)
Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora)
Musk Thistle (Carduus nutans)
Old World Climbing Fern (Lygodium microphyllum)
Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus)
Princess Tree (Paulownia tomentosa)
Purple Star Thistle (Centaurea calcitrapa)
Quackgrass (Elymus repens)
Russian Knapweed (Rhaponticum repens)
Russian Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia)
Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.)
St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum)
Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius)
Scotch Thistle (Onopordum acanthium)
Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe)
Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima)
Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum)
Whitetop (Lepidium draba)
Witchweed (Striga asiatica)
Yellow Star Thistle (Centaurea solstitialis)
Yellow Toadflax (Linaria vulgaris)

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About Anya Pozdeeva, vifarms

Vertically Integrated Urbarn Aquaponics, Permaponics, Permaculture and Sustainable Living, New York Style! www.vifarms.com
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