Weed Harvesting + behold the Japanese Honeysuckle!

The weed picking was a tremendous success! We – about 20 people- worked mainly on collecting Asiatic Bittersweet and Japanese Honeysuckle. I brought a big bad of the Asiatic Bittersweet home to make tinctures and teas, for it possess amazing health properties, including but not limited to anticancer and antiflamatory. The Garlic Mustard is not up yet, we will come back for it in a few weeks; I can’t wait.
Japanese Honeysuckle didn’t have flowers yet, so we have to wait a little as well, but in a meanwhile, behold:
Japanese honeysuckle is edible and medicinal. High in Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium, the leaves can be parboiled and eaten as a vegetable. The edible buds and flowers, made into a syrup or puddings. The entire plant has been used as an alternative medicine for thousands of years in Asia. The active constituents include calcium, elaidic-acid, hcn, inositol, linoleic-acid, lonicerin, luteolin, magnesium, myristic-acid, potassium, tannin, and zink. It is alterative, antibacterial, antiinflammatory, antispasmodic, depurative, diuretic, febrifuge, and is also used to reduce blood pressure. The stems are used internally in the treatment of acute rheumatoid arthritis, mumps and hepatitis. The stems are harvested in the autumn and winter, and are dried for later herb use. The stems and flowers are used together a medicinal infusion in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections (including pneumonia) and dysentery. An infusion of the flower buds is used in the treatment of a wide range of ailments including syphillitic skin diseases and tumors, bacterial dysentery, colds, and enteritis. Experimentally, the flower extracts have been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels and are antibacterial, antiviral and tuberculostatic. Externally, the flowers are applied as a medicinal wash to skin inflammations, infectious rashes and sores. The flowers are harvested in early morning before they open and are dried for later herb use. This plant has become a serious weed in many areas of N. America, it might have the potential to be utilized for proven medicinal purposes. Other uses include; Ground cover, Insecticide, Basketry, vines used to make baskets. The white-flowers of cultivar ‘Halliana’ has a pronounced lemon-like perfume.
From http://www.altnature.com/gallery/Japanese_Honeysuckle.htm

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About Anya Pozdeeva, vifarms

Vertically Integrated Urbarn Aquaponics, Permaponics, Permaculture and Sustainable Living, New York Style! www.vifarms.com
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One Response to Weed Harvesting + behold the Japanese Honeysuckle!

  1. Judith says:

    Thank you for your information on the edible and medicinal uses of Japanese honeysuckle, Lonicera japonica. We have tons in this area and I would like to try it. JD

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