Plantain is still following you..

English plantain P. Lanceolata

English plantain P. Lanceolata


Plantain has been used medicinally by Europeans for centuries. Herbals dating from the 1500’s and 1600’s are full of recipes and uses for plantain.
Plantain was brought to the US by European settlers who valued it for it’s culinary and medicinal properties. The settlers seemed to leave the plant wherever they went, thus earning it the name “White Man’s Foot’ by the native Americans.

Plantain is very high in beta carotene (A) and calcium. It also provides ascorbic acid (C), and vitamin K. Among the more notable elements found in plantain are allantion, apigenin, aucubin, baicalein, linoleic acid, oleanolic acid, sorbitol, and tannin. Together these constituents are thought to give plantain mild anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antihemorrhagic, and expectorant actions. Acubin has been reported in the “Journal of Toxicology” as a powerful anti-toxin. Allantoin has been proved to promote wound healing, speed up cell regeneration, and have skin-softening effects. The fresh leaves can be applied directly three or four times per day to minor injuries, dermatitis, and insect stings.
On the picture: Instant Plantain bandage help healing my painful minor cuts much faster and keep them un-infected. I used a hair band to secure Plantain leafs on my wrist.

Broadleaf Plantain bandage


Broadleaf Plantain bandage

The German Commission E officially recommends using 1/4-1/2 teaspoon (1-3 grams) of the leaf daily in the form of tea made by steeping the herb in 1 cup (250 ml) of hot water for 10-15 minutes (making three cups (750 ml ) per day).

As a green, Plantain fresh-picked leaves are nice in any of your favorite salads, their flavor has a hint of black truffle.

Plantain Oil

Plantain Oil


Plantain infused oil.
Plantain oil is a wonderful remedy for any skin problems, for adults, children and babies.
Fill a container with fresh plantain leaves that have been lightly bruised or crushed. Cover the leaves vegetable oil of your choice,- I like to use olive, grape seed or almond; cover the container, and let it sit in the sun for 2-4 weeks. The oil will turn a dark- green color. Strain out the leaves and use.
To make salve, Add 1-½ tablespoons of natural beeswax for each ounce of oil.

Plantain Oil Loaf

Plantain Oil Loaf


Plantain Oil Loaf.
You can eat Plantain oil raw as a deep, just like olive oil or cook with it.
I baked delicious Plantain breads using 1 cup oil, 2 eggs, 1 cup sugar,
pinch salt, 1 tbsp. lemon juice, ½ cup oats, 2 cups flour and ½ tsp. baking soda.
To make it more interesting, I add ½ cup chopped fresh plantain leaves and a tablespoon of Shepherd’s Purse seed pods, just because it was growing nearby. Mix all the ingredients, pour batter into the molds and bake 30-40 min at 350F.

For more amazing recipes and plants that will save your life, vists FoodUnderYourFeet.com or VIfarms.com where you can find the e-book “Food Under Your Feet”, by Anya Pozdeeva.
Come back for more seasonal updates, and don’t forget to look where you step!

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About Anya Pozdeeva, vifarms

Vertically Integrated Urbarn Aquaponics, Permaponics, Permaculture and Sustainable Living, New York Style! www.vifarms.com
This entry was posted in Beyond Organic, Edible Invasive Weeds, Food Forestry and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Plantain is still following you..

  1. Joan says:

    I wonder what I did wrong – I just crunched up some plantain leaves manually and put them into a bottle of baby oil. I left it in the sun for several weeks, but it never turned dark and it smells bad. Is it still any use?

    • not sure how the mineral oils work with the herbs- I only use vegetable oils. I suggest using only the edible oils for your cosmetics, If you can eat it, your skin can absorb it as well.
      I have plantain leafs sitting in olive oil for 3 months now, and no problem with smell. At some point you want to take the leaves out. Also, it helps to dry to leaves first to minimize the risk of rotting

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